Wednesday, 21 June 2017

The Molly Who Was a Terror at Eating

There was, upon a time, a man who had a molly, and it was so terribly big and such a terror at eating that he could not have her any longer. So she should be taken to the river, with a stone about her neck; but before she should go, she was given a meal. The wife put a porridge bowl before her, and a small trough of butter-fat. She guzzled this down, and set off through the window. There stood the husband in the barn, threshing.

“Good day, man of the house,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly,” said the man; “have you had any food today?” he said.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” she said; and so she took and ate up the man.

When she had done this, she went to the cow-shed; there sat the wife, milking.

“Good day, you wife in the cow-shed,” said the molly.

“Good day, is that you, molly?” said the wife; “have you eaten up your food?” she said.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the wife.

“Good day, you bell-cow,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the bell-cow.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the bell-cow, too.

Then she sat up in the garden; there stood a man, coppicing.

“Good day, you man in the coppice,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the woodsman.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the woodsman, too.

Then she came to a cairn; there stood a weasel, peeping out.

“Good day, you weasel in the cairn,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the weasel.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the weasel, too.

When she had gone a distance more, she came to a hazel thicket; there sat a squirrel, gathering nuts.

“Good day, you squirrel in the thicket,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the squirrel.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the squirrel, too.

When she had gone a distance more, she met Mikkel the fox, who was lurking at the edge of the forest.

“Good day, Mikkel Smittom,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the fox.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the fox, too.

When she had gone a little more, she met a hare.

“Good day, you hopping hare,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the hare.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the hare, too.

When she had gone a way further, she met a greyshanks.

“Good day, greyshanks the wise,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the greyshanks.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the greyshanks, too.

So she went into the forest, and when she had gone far, and farther than far, over mountains and deep valleys, she met a bear cub.

“Good day, jumping bear,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the bear cub.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the bear cub, too.

When the molly had come a little further on, she met the she-bear, who ripped at the stumps so that the splinters flew, she was so enraged that she had lost her cub.

“Good day, bitter she-bear,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the bear.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the she-bear, too

When the molly had come a little further on, she met the bear himself.

“Good day, goodman bear,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the bear.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the bear, too.

So the molly went far and farther than far, until she came back to the village; there she met a wedding party on the road.

“Good day, you wedding party on the road,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the wedding party.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she ate up both the bride and the bridesgroom and the whole wedding party, with the kitchen master and the fiddler and the horses, and everything.

When she had gone a way further, she came to the church, where she met a funeral party.

“Good day, you funeral party by the church,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the funeral party.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear and the wedding party in the road, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she set upon the funeral party and ate up both the body and the funeral party.

When she had done this, she went to heaven, and when she had gone far, and farther than far, she met the moon in the clouds.

“Good day, you moon in the clouds,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the moon.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear and the wedding party in the road and the funeral party by the church, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and set up the moon, and ate it up, both in its waxing and in its waning.

Then the molly went far, and father than far, until she met the sun.

“Good day, you sun in the sky,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the sun.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear and the wedding party in the road and the funeral party by the church and the moon in the clouds, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly; and so she took and ate up the sun in the sky.

So the molly went far, and father than far, until she came to a bridge; there she met a huge billy-goat.

“Good day, you buck on the bridge,” said the molly.

“Good day, molly; have you had any food today?” said the buck.

“Oh, I have had a little, but I am mostly fasting,” said the molly; “it has only been a porridge bowl and a trough of butter-fat and the husband of the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear and the wedding party in the road and the funeral party by the church and the moon in the clouds and the sun in the sky, and swing me round if I don’t take you, too,” said the molly.

“We shall quarrel about that,” said the buck, and butted the molly so that she fell off the bridge and into the river, and there she burst.

Then they climbed out, and each went on their way, and were just as whole as before, all whom the molly had eaten, both the husband in the house and the wife in the cow-shed and the bell-cow in the stall and the man in the coppice and the weasel in the cairn and the squirrel in the thicket and Mikkel Smittom and the hopping hare and greyshanks the wise and jumping bear and bitter she-bear and goodman bear and the wedding party in the road and the funeral party by the church and the moon in the clouds and the sun in the sky.

4 comments:

  1. Oops !did the squirrel escape being eaten ? Still love the gorry stories tho'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice catch. I have corrected it now.

      Delete
    2. Check that paragraph again. I think the molly ate the fox twice. Nice story, anyway :-)

      Delete
    3. Gah! Sorted. I start cumulative tales at the bottom, and copy/ paste upwards, deleting portions, and changing words as I go. It appears I have not been dilligent enough this time. Thanks for the corrections.

      Delete